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5 Rules for Twitter Promotion

How to Use Twitter to Promote Your Business

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5 Rules for Twitter Promotion

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Image (c) Twitter

Twitter promotion is one of the main reasons that businesses of all sizes have been flocking to Twitter.

Twitter lets you instantly get the word out about your product, service, project, or idea. But to use Twitter promotion, you have to be the sort of Twitterer that people will choose to follow, as only your followers will ever see your tweets (posts).

What you have to do to get followed? Just follow these Twitter promotion rules:

How to Use Twitter

Tip #1) Don't sell - converse.

Twitter has been described as a virtual water cooler. Imagine you were really standing by one chatting with your co-workers and a stranger walked up and launched into a high-pressure sales pitch. What would you do?

Uh huh. Thought so.

And doing the same sort of thing online by sending out sales pitch after sales pitch will get the same response.

Your goal on Twitter is to converse with people, not send them running. They'll get interested in your products and/or services without you waving them in their faces all the time. Especially if you follow the rest of the rules for Twitter promotion here.

Tip #2) Listen more than you tweet.

Beginners especially should pay close attention to this rule. Being on Twitter at first is like being at a party full of strangers. The first thing to do is to find out who they are and what they’re talking about. That's the only way you can figure out how you might fit into what’s going on and make your own contribution.

So the first step in learning how to use Twitter is to choose people to follow and read their tweets. Use Twitter Search to see what people are saying (tweeting) about particular topics that interest you.

Tip #3) Be helpful.

Of course you should tweet, too!

It's just that for successful Twitter promotion, you have to make sure that your tweets aren't perceived as ads. Your posts need to offer people something, whether it's information or entertainment. And don’t forget that you can reply to other people's tweets, too, answering their questions or commenting on their ideas.

Helpful people are people that other people want to converse with. People that you actually converse with are going to be the most receptive to your message.

Tip #4) Give your followers what they want.

I'm guessing that you don't care that I'm sipping a decaf coffee as I write this or have a doctor's appointment later today.

That's okay – I understand.

You're reading this article because you want information on how to use Twitter effectively, not because you have a burning desire to know what I do every minute of the day.

Twitter is the same.

When you choose to follow me on Twitter, you can tell from my account name (SmallBizCanada) and my bio (Small business expert and writer) that I am going to tweet about small business. That's what you expect. So if I go off into rants about what a great band Led Zeppelin was or asking advice on how to keep rabbits out of my garden, you're going to be confused or worse, irritated.

 

If I did want to go on about this sort of thing, I would set up another Twitter account.

Keep your follower's expectations in mind and be sure you're meeting them.

Tip #5) Don't just feed them feeds.

If you have a website with a RSS feed, it's easy to set up Twitter so it will automatically read and send out your feed - which is great. But don't just leave it at that.

Twitter is a virtual water cooler, remember, not a bulletin board. You need to be there, to be participating in the conversation.

So, yes, use Twitterfeed to get your RSS feed picked up and sent out automatically as part of your Twitter promotion strategy, but make sure you're also reading other tweets, responding to them, and sending out other tweets of your own.

The Bottom Line

Like any other social media application, the more you put into Twitter, the more rewarding you'll find using it. And if you follow the rules, Twitter can be an excellent promotion tool for your small business.

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